One shot of the Sputnik V vaccine triggers strong antibody responses

A single dose of the Sputnik V vaccine may elicit significant antibody responses against SARS-CoV-2, finds a study published July 13 in the journal Cell Reports Medicine.

"Due to limited vaccine supply and uneven vaccine distribution in many regions of the world, health authorities urgently need data on the immune response to vaccines to optimize vaccination strategies," says senior author Andrea Gamarnik of the FundaciĆ³n Instituto Leloir-CONICET in Buenos Aires, Argentina. "The peer-reviewed data we present provide information for guiding public health decisions in light of the current global health emergency."

Past research has shown that two doses of Sputnik V results in 92% efficacy against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by SARS-CoV-2. An important question is whether a single dose would achieve greater public health benefit than two doses by allowing protection of a larger population more quickly.

Evidence from other vaccines offers support for the one-shot approach. The AstraZeneca vaccine shows 76% efficacy after a single dose, and the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines may induce sufficient immunity in previously infected individuals after one dose, with no apparent benefit of an additional dose.

In the Cell Reports Medicine study, Gamarnik and her colleagues compared the effects of one and two shots of Sputnik V on SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody responses in 289 healthcare workers in Argentina. Three weeks after the second dose, all volunteers with no prior infection generated virus-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies - the most common type of antibody found in blood.

But even within three weeks of receiving the first dose, 94% of these participants developed IgG antibodies against the virus, and 90% showed evidence of neutralizing antibodies, which interfere with the ability of viruses to infect cells.

Additional results showed that IgG and neutralizing antibody levels in previously infected participants were significantly higher after one dose than those in fully vaccinated volunteers with no history of infection. A second dose did not increase the production of neutralizing antibodies in previously infected volunteers.

"This highlights the robust response to vaccination of previously infected individuals, suggesting that naturally acquired immunity might be enhanced sufficiently by a single dose, in agreement with recent studies using mRNA vaccines," Gamarnik says.

Further studies are needed to evaluate the duration of the immune response and to assess how antibody levels relate to vaccine protection against COVID-19. "Evidence based on quantitative information will guide vaccine deployment strategies in the face of worldwide vaccine supply restriction," Gamarnik says.

Rossi and Ojeda et al.
Sputnik V Vaccine Elicits Seroconversion and Neutralizing Capacity to SARS-CoV-2 after a Single Dose.
Cell Reports Medicine, 2021. doi: 10.1016/j.xcrm.2021.100359

Most Popular Now

Positive new data for Johnson & Johnson single…

Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) (the Company) announced data that demonstrated its single-shot COVID-19 vaccine generated strong, persistent activity against the rapidly sp...

GSK and Alector announce global collaboration in i…

GlaxoSmithKline plc (LSE/NYSE: GSK) and Alector (Nasdaq: ALEC), today announced a strategic global collaboration for the development and commercialisation of two clinical...

Tezepelumab granted Priority Review by U.S. FDA

Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted a Biologics License Application (BLA) and granted Priority Review for tezepelu...

One shot of the Sputnik V vaccine triggers strong …

A single dose of the Sputnik V vaccine may elicit significant antibody responses against SARS-CoV-2, finds a study published July 13 in the journal Cell Reports Medicine...

Are silver nanoparticles a silver bullet against m…

Antimicrobials are used to kill or slow the growth of bacteria, viruses and other microorganisms. They can be in the form of antibiotics, used to treat bodily infections...

"Long COVID": More than a quarter of COV…

In a new study of adults from the general population who were infected with COVID-19 in 2020, more than a quarter report not having fully recovered after six to eight mon...

mRNA vaccines slash risk of COVID-19 infection by …

People who receive mRNA COVID-19 vaccines are up to 91 percent less likely to develop the disease than those who are unvaccinated, according to a new nationwide study of ...

Cancer cells eat themselves to survive

It is the membrane of cancer cells that is at the focus of the new research now showing a completely new way in which cancer cells can repair the damage that can otherwis...

U.S. FDA grants Priority Review for the Biologics …

Pfizer Inc. (NYSE: PFE) and BioNTech SE (Nasdaq: BNTX) announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted Priority Review designation for the Biologics Li...

Collaboration between AbbVie, Biogen and Pfizer cr…

The access to the world's largest browsable resource linking rare protein-coding genetic variants to human health and disease was launched through a genetic exome sequenc...

Artificial intelligence could be new blueprint for…

Writing in the July 12, 2021 online issue of Nature Communications, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine describe a new approach that uses...

Anti-tumor agent from the intestine

It is believed to be involved in the development of chronic inflammatory intestinal diseases, to trigger diabetes, to be responsible for obesity, even neurological diseas...