Nations that consume a lot of milk... also win a lot of Nobel prizes

Nations that consume a lot of milk and milk products also tend to have a lot of Nobel laureates among their populations, suggest the authors of a letter, published in Practical Neurology. Research published last year in the New England Journal of Medicine reported a strong association between a nation's chocolate consumption and Nobel laureate prowess, speculating that the flavonoid content of chocolate was behind the boost in brain power.

This got the letter authors thinking. As chocolate is often combined with milk, could it be the amount of milk/milk products consumed per head that fuels Nobel Prize success?

They looked at the 2007 data from the Food and Agriculture Organization on per capita milk consumption in 22 countries as well as the information provided by the author of the chocolate theory, and found a significant association.

Sweden has the most Nobel laureates per 10 million of its population (33). Although, it hosts the Nobel committee, which some might argue could introduce an element of bias; it also consumes the most milk per head of the population, getting through 340kg every year.

And Switzerland, which knocks back 300kg of the white stuff every year, has a Nobel haul of similar proportions (32).

At the other end of the scale, China has the lowest number of Nobel laureates in its population. But it also has the lowest milk consumption of the countries studied—at around 25kg a year.

There does seem to be a ceiling effect, however, note the authors, with no discernible impact beyond an annual per capita consumption of 350kg, as Finland's Nobel haul seems to attest.

Is milk consumption therefore simply a reflection of a strong educational system, or do Nobel Prize winners celebrate by drinking it, query the authors?

But there is a plausible biological explanation for the link: milk is rich in vitamin D, and this may boost brain power, the evidence suggests.

"So to improve your chances of winning Nobel prizes you should not only eat more chocolate but perhaps drink milk too: or strive for synergy with hot chocolate," conclude the authors, who highlight their conflicts of interest, which include a tendency to take milk with cereal and coffee, and to eat chocolate whenever the opportunity arises.

Milk, chocolate, and Nobel prizes Pract Neurol 2013;13: 63 doi 10.1136/practneurol-2012-000471

Most Popular Now

FDA approves drug to treat ALS

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Radicava (edaravone) to treat patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig's...

Read more

FDA approves first cancer treatment for any solid …

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to a treatment for patients whose cancers have a specific genetic feature (biomarker). This is th...

Read more

Sanofi and Regeneron announce FDA Approval of Kevz…

Sanofi and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. have announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of Kevzara® (sarilumab) for the treatment of adult patients...

Read more

AstraZeneca marks a key milestone with the ‘toppin…

AstraZeneca marks a key milestone in its successful move to Cambridge, UK, with the 'topping out' of its new, state-of-the-art, strategic R&D centre and global corporate ...

Read more

FDA approves first treatment for a form of Batten …

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Brineura (cerliponase alfa) as a treatment for a specific form of Batten disease. Brineura is the first FDA-approved ...

Read more

Abbott announces CE Mark and first use of the worl…

Abbott (NYSE: ABT) today announced CE Mark and first use of the new Confirm RxTM Insertable Cardiac Monitor (ICM), the world's first smartphone compatible ICM that will h...

Read more

Imfinzi significantly reduces the risk of disease …

AstraZeneca and MedImmune, its global biologics research and development arm, today announced positive results for the Phase III PACIFIC trial, a randomised, double-blind...

Read more

Antibiotic doxycycline may offer hope for treatmen…

A study published in the journal Scientific Reports suggests that doxycycline, an antibiotic used for over half a century against bacterial infections, can be prescribed ...

Read more

Novartis exercises exclusive option agreement with…

Novartis announced today that it has notified Conatus Pharmaceuticals Inc., of its exercise of the option to an exclusive license for the global development and commercia...

Read more

England's Cancer Drugs Fund 'failed to deliver mea…

Analysis of the drugs that were approved for use by the NHS Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF) in England has shown that the fund was not good value for patients and society and may...

Read more

High levels of exercise linked to nine years of le…

Despite their best efforts, no scientist has ever come close to stopping humans from aging. Even anti-aging creams can't stop Old Father Time. But new research from Brigh...

Read more

Vitamin A deficiency is detrimental to blood stem …

Many specialized cells, such as in the skin, gut or blood, have a lifespan of only a few days. Therefore, steady replenishment of these cells is indispensable. They arise...

Read more

Pharmaceutical Companies

[ A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Z ]