Vitamin K2: New hope for Parkinson's patients?

Neuroscientist Patrik Verstreken, associated with VIB and KU Leuven, succeeded in undoing the effect of one of the genetic defects that leads to Parkinson's using vitamin K2. His discovery gives hope to Parkinson's patients. This research was done in collaboration with colleagues from Northern Illinois University (US) published on the website of the authorative journal Science.

"It appears from our research that administering vitamin K2 could possibly help patients with Parkinson's. However, more work needs to be done to understand this better," says Patrik Verstreken.

If we looked at cells as small factories, then mitochondria would be the power plants responsible for supplying the energy for their operation. They generate this energy by transporting electrons. In Parkinson's patients, the activity of mitochondria and the transport of electrons have been disrupted, resulting in the mitochondria no longer producing sufficient energy for the cell. This has major consequences as the cells in certain parts of the brain will start dying off, disrupting communication between neurons. The results are the typical symptoms of Parkinson's: lack of movement (akinesia), tremors and muscle stiffness.

The exact cause of this neurodegenerative disease is not known. In recent years, however, scientists have been able to describe several genetic defects (mutations) found in Parkinson's patients, including the so-called PINK1 and Parkin mutations, which both lead to reduced mitochondrial activity. By studying these mutations, scientists hope to unravel the mechanisms underlying the disease process.

Fruit flies (Drosophila) are frequently used in lab experiments because of their short life spans and breeding cycles, among other things. Within two weeks of her emergence, every female is able to produce hundreds of offspring. By genetically modifying fruitflies, scientists can study the function of certain genes and proteins. Patrik Verstreken and his team used fruitflies with a genetic defect in PINK1 or Parkin that is similar to the one associated with Parkinson's. They found that the flies with a PINK1 or Parkin mutation lost their ability to fly.

Upon closer examination, they discovered that the mitochondria in these flies were defective, just as in Parkinson's patients. Because of this they generated less intracellular energy – energy the insects needed to fly. When the flies were given vitamin K2, the energy production in their mitochondria was restored and the insects' ability to fly improved. The researchers were also able to determine that the energy production was restored because the vitamin K2 had improved electron transport in the mitochondria. This in turn led to improved energy production.

Vitamin K2 plays a role in the energy production of defective mitochondria. Because defective mitochondria are also found in Parkinson's patients with a PINK1 or Parkin mutation, vitamin K2 potentially offers hope for a new treatment for Parkinson's.

Most Popular Now

FDA approves first biosimilar for the treatment of…

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Mvasi (bevacizumab-awwb) as a biosimilar to Avastin (bevacizumab) for the treatment of multiple types of cancer. Mvas...

Merck set to join forces with Project Data Sphere …

Merck, a leading science and technology company has announced that it will enter into a strategic collaboration with Project Data Sphere LLC, an independent, not-for-prof...

FDA approval brings first gene therapy to the Unit…

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a historic action today making the first gene therapy available in the United States, ushering in a new approach to the treat...

Novartis appoints Bertrand Bodson as Chief Digital…

Novartis announced today that Bertrand Bodson, Chief Digital and Marketing Officer for Sainsbury's Argos, has been appointed to the new role of Chief Digital Officer, rep...

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. receive…

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved CyltezoTM, a biosimilar to Humira®*, in a pre-filled sy...

Amgen and Humana partner for improved health outco…

Two of the nation's leading health organizations, health and well-being company Humana Inc. (NYSE: HUM) and biotechnology company Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN), have teamed up to i...

This is how belly fat could increase your cancer r…

It's been well established that obesity is a contributor to cancer risk, but how it actually causes cancer is still a question that hasn't been fully explained. A new Mic...

Asthma medicine halves risk of Parkinson's

Parkinson's disease is a chronic disease with unknown causes. The disease destroys the brain cells that control body movements. Shivering, stiff arms and legs and poor co...

Tezepelumab significantly reduced asthma exacerbat…

AstraZeneca and Amgen Inc. (Amgen) announce results from the PATHWAY Phase IIb trial of tezepelumab that showed a significant reduction in the annual asthma exacerbation ...

Boehringer Ingelheim initiates Phase IIa study of …

Boehringer Ingelheim and pharmaceutical company Pharmaxis (ASX: PXS) announce that Boehringer Ingelheim has initiated a European and North American Phase IIa trial in NAS...

Victoza® reduces the risk of major cardiovascular …

A new analysis of the landmark LEADER trial shows that Victoza® (liraglutide) reduced the risk of major cardiovascular (CV) events in people with type 2 diabetes at high ...

Extended treatment with Brilinta reduces risk of c…

AstraZeneca today announced results from a new sub-analysis of data from the Phase III PEGASUS-TIMI 54 trial demonstrating a 29% risk reduction in CV death (p=0.0041) fro...

Pharmaceutical Companies

[ A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Z ]