Global survey reveals that physicians need more information to assess the impact of treatment sequencing on patient survival in EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC

Boehringer IngelheimResults from a new global survey revealed that more than one-third (36%) of the 310 physicians surveyed do not think they have sufficient information required to make informed decisions on how to sequence treatments for patients with epidermal growth factor receptor mutation-positive (EGFR M+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The survey results will be presented today as a late-breaking abstract (P3.01-108) at the 2018 World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) in Toronto, Canada.

The two most important treatment goals identified by those surveyed were increasing overall survival (OS) (77%), followed by quality of life (QoL) (69%), irrespective of the line of treatment.

Findings show that more than half (55%) of physicians strongly preferred a treatment sequence that offers patients the maximum time on targeted treatments. Furthermore, physicians reported that there is a strong need for information on potential treatment resistance mutations before changing their current treatment practice.

More information to make informed treatment decisions was needed depending on whether physicians preferred:

  • a first-line targeted treatment with the longest progression-free survival (PFS), or
  • a first-line targeted treatment which offers the potential to use a different targeted therapy in second-line.

43% of those who preferred a treatment offering the longest PFS said they needed more information to make an informed treatment decision on the sequencing of targeted treatments compared to 23% of those who favour a first-line targeted treatment which offers the potential to use a targeted therapy in second-line.

Prof. Dr. Thomas Wehler PhD, Evangelisches Krankenhaus, Hamm, Germany, commented, "The results of this study show that physicians are unclear as to the best way to sequence targeted treatments in order to increase survival times, which is the main goal when selecting treatments for patients with EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC. More information and guidance around the impact of treatment sequencing on overall survival is required to support physicians when making treatment decisions."

Dr. Victoria Zazulina, Global Head of Solid Tumour Oncology, Medicine at Boehringer Ingelheim, commented, "The availability of more treatment options means physicians now have the opportunity to sequence targeted treatments for EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC patients and consider the bigger picture from diagnosis. We undertook this research to learn what considerations guide physicians’ decisions to sequence targeted therapies, and this study unveiled the gap in clinical data that could clearly inform such decisions. Consequently, we embarked on a real-world evidence study evaluating the EGFR Tyrosine Kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment sequence in patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC, and are looking forward to sharing the outcomes with the physician community later this year."

About the survey

The Boehringer Ingelheim-sponsored survey evaluated 310 physicians (Oncologists, Pulmonologists, Respiratory Surgeons and Internal Respiratory Specialists) across four countries (China: 70, Germany: 70, Japan: 70 and USA: 100). The survey aimed to assess current attitudes towards decision making for Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI) sequencing to determine what matters most when selecting a treatment and what challenges physicians face when initiating targeted treatment in EGFR M+ NSCLC patients.

About Boehringer Ingelheim in Oncology

Cancer takes away loved ones, time and untapped potential. At Boehringer Ingelheim we are providing new hope for patients by taking cancer on. We are collaborating with the oncology community to deliver scientific breakthroughs to transform the lives of patients. Our primary focus is in lung and gastrointestinal cancers, with the goal of delivering breakthrough, first-in-class treatments that can help win the fight against cancer. Our commitment to innovation has resulted in pioneering treatments for lung cancer and we are advancing a unique pipeline of cancer cell directed agents, immune oncology therapies and intelligent combination approaches to help combat many cancers.

About Boehringer Ingelheim

Improving the health and quality of life of patients is the goal of the research-driven pharmaceutical company Boehringer Ingelheim. The focus in doing so is on diseases for which no satisfactory treatment option exists to date. The company therefore concentrates on developing innovative therapies that can extend patients' lives. In animal health, Boehringer Ingelheim stands for advanced prevention.

Family-owned since it was established in 1885, Boehringer Ingelheim is one of the pharmaceutical industry’s top 20 companies. Some 50,000 employees create value through innovation daily for the three business areas human pharmaceuticals, animal health and biopharmaceuticals. In 2017, Boehringer Ingelheim achieved net sales of nearly 18.1 billion euros. R&D expenditure, exceeding three billion euros, corresponded to 17.0 per cent of net sales.

As a family-owned company, Boehringer Ingelheim plans in generations and focuses on long-term success. The company therefore aims at organic growth from its own resources with simultaneous openness to partnerships and strategic alliances in research. In everything it does, Boehringer Ingelheim naturally adopts responsibility towards mankind and the environment.

Wehler T. et al. Oncologist Treatment Considerations and Selection in EGFR M+ NSCLC. Poster #P3.01-108 presented at the World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) 2018 in Toronto, Canada, 26 September 2018.

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