Phage therapy shown to kill drug-resistant superbug

Scientists from the University of Liverpool have shown that phage therapy could offer a safe and effective alternative to antibiotics in the treatment of Cystic Fibrosis lung infections. Chronic lung infections caused by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa are becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to antimicrobial resistance (AMR). With limited alternative therapeutic options available this has led to a renewed interest in (bacterio)phage therapy.

Phages are viruses that kill bacteria but are otherwise harmless. A major advantage is that phages only target the harmful bacteria, so there are less side of the effects often associated with antibiotics. Phage therapy however has not had the same level of funding as drug development, due to a lack of convincing pre-clinical efficacy studies.

Here for the first time, researchers have shown that phage therapy is highly effective in treating established and recalcitrant chronic respiratory tract infections caused by multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. They show that phages are capable of killing the bacteria in long term infected lungs, such as those suffered by patients with the inherited disease Cystic Fibrosis, indicating a potential new therapeutic option for these hard to treat life threatening infections.

Professor Aras Kadioglu, from the University's Institute of Infection and Global Health, who led the study, said: "Given the increasing problems caused by bacteria that are resistant to treatment with antibiotics, there is an urgent need to develop new approaches. We have shown that phage therapy has the potential to offer a safe and effective alternative for the treatment of such persistent bacterial infections."

Professor Craig Winstanley, who co-led the study, added: "Cystic Fibrosis patients face the prospect of life-long treatment with antibiotics, which often prove ineffective and can have side effects, especially when used for long periods. Hence phage therapy could be a particularly valuable addition to the treatment of chronic lung infections in these patients."

The recent UK Government Review on Antimicrobial Resistance by Jim O'Neil, highlights phage therapy as a potential alternative to antibiotics in the treatment of AMR infections. In addition, the WHO recently identified Pseudomonas aeruginosa as one of the key pathogens against which there is a critical need to develop new therapies. This new study provides valuable pre-clinical evidence for phage therapy being a viable option.

Waters EM, Neill DR, Kaman B, Sahota JS, Clokie MR, Winstanley C, Kadioglu A.
Phage therapy is highly effective against chronic lung infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
Thorax. 2017 Mar 6. pii: thoraxjnl-2016-209265. doi: 10.1136/thoraxjnl-2016-209265.

Most Popular Now

Top 20 breaking World Pharma News of 2018

World Pharma News proudly presents the top 20 most popular breaking news from 2018. Have a wonderful 2019 New(s) Year filled with health, happiness, and spectacular succe...

Bristol-Myers Squibb to acquire Celgene to create …

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE:BMY) and Celgene Corporation (NASDAQ:CELG) today announced that they have entered into a definitive merger agreement under which Bristo...

Lynparza meets primary endpoint in Phase III SOLO-…

AstraZeneca and Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, N.J., US (Merck: known as MSD outside the US and Canada) announced positive results from the randomised, open-label, contro...

Pediatric leukemia 'super drug' could be developed…

Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered two successful therapies that slowed the progression of pediatric leukemia in mice, according to three studies published ...

Researchers uncover new mechanism of gene regulati…

Genes contain all the information needed for the functioning of cells, tissues, and organs in our body. Gene expression, meaning when and how are the genes being read and...

AstraZeneca announces organisational changes

AstraZeneca is today announcing organisational changes to support continued scientific innovation and commercial success in the main therapy areas as the Company enters a...

Tumors backfire on chemotherapy

Some patients with breast cancer receive chemotherapy before the tumor is removed with surgery. This approach, called 'neoadjuvant' therapy, helps to reduce the size of t...

Sandoz and Pear Therapeutics announce US launch of…

Sandoz Inc., a Novartis division, and Pear Therapeutics, Inc., announced today the US commercial launch of reSET-O(TM) for patients with Opioid Use Disorder (OUD). reSET-...

Boehringer Ingelheim initiates a collaborative par…

Science 37, an industry leader in virtual clinical trials, and Boehringer Ingelheim announced a technology enterprise collaboration agreement that will support Boehringer...

Pfizer initiates phase 2b/3 clinical trial for PF-…

Pfizer Inc. (NYSE: PFE) announced the initiation of a Phase 2b/3 clinical trial for its oral JAK3 inhibitor, PF-06651600, for the treatment of patients with moderate to s...

Stopping cancer from recruiting immune system doub…

Cancerous tumors trick myeloid cells, an important part of the immune system, into perceiving them as a damaged part of the body; the tumors actually put myeloid cells to...

EVENITY™ (romosozumab) receives approval in Japan …

Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) and UCB (Euronext Brussels: UCB) announced that the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare has granted a marketing authorization for EVENITY™ ...