Bristol-Myers Squibb announces global collaboration with leading academic institutions

Bristol-Myers SquibbBristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE: BMY) announced the formation of the International Immuno-Oncology Network (II-ON), a global collaboration between industry and academia that aims to further the scientific understanding of immuno-oncology. Immuno-oncology focuses on the potential of harnessing the intelligence of the body's own immune system to fight cancer. In addition to Bristol-Myers Squibb, the II-ON is currently comprised of ten leading cancer-research institutions, including:
  • Clinica Universidad Navarra, Pamplona, Spain
  • Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
  • The Earle A. Chiles Research Institute (Providence Health & Services), Portland, OR
  • Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France
  • Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori “Fondazione G. Pascale,” Naples, Italy
  • Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore MD
  • Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY
  • The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and The Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK
  • The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, NL
  • The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

An objective of this collaborative forum is to facilitate the translation of scientific research findings into clinical trials and, eventually, clinical practice. It will also work to further advance innovation in drug discovery and development.

"The International Immuno-Oncology Network facilitates a public-private partnership that will leverage intellectual capabilities across a global network," said Elliott Sigal, M.D., Ph.D., executive vice president, chief scientific officer and president, Research and Development, Bristol-Myers Squibb. "The shared commitment of all those participating in this collaboration is to evolve our understanding of immuno-oncology towards our ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes."

The role of immuno-oncology in cancer research is growing and in 2011 the concept of "evading immune destruction" was added to the "Hallmarks of Cancer," a widely-referenced peer-reviewed article outlining traits that are believed to be the underlying principles of cancer.

Immuno-Oncology at Bristol-Myers Squibb
The substantial potential of the immune system's intrinsic ability to fight cancer is fundamental to immuno-oncology research at Bristol-Myers Squibb and its ongoing commitment to advancing cancer care. The company is exploring a variety of compounds and immunotherapeutic approaches for patients with different types of cancer, and the formation of the II-ON is an important example of the company's commitment to this area of research.

About Bristol-Myers Squibb
Bristol-Myers Squibb is a global biopharmaceutical company whose mission is to discover, develop and deliver innovative medicines that help patients prevail over serious diseases.

Most Popular Now

Delivering insulin in a pill

Given the choice of taking a pill or injecting oneself with a needle, most of us would opt to regulate a chronic health condition by swallowing a pill. But for millions o...

Can aspirin treat Alzheimer's?

A regimen of low-dose aspirin potentially may reduce plaques in the brain, which will reduce Alzheimer's disease pathology and protect memory, according to neurological r...

Probiotics can protect the skeletons of older wome…

For the first time in the world, researchers at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have demonstrated that probiotics, dietary supplements with health-promoting bacteri...

Alzheimer's breakthrough: Brain metals that may dr…

Alzheimer's disease could be better treated, thanks to a breakthrough discovery of the properties of the metals in the brain involved in the progression of the neurodegen...

FDA approves first drug comprised of an active ing…

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Epidiolex (cannabidiol) [CBD] oral solution for the treatment of seizures associated with two rare and severe forms o...

Researchers develop a new method for turning skin …

Our bodies consist of many different kinds of cells, each with their own role. The Japanese scientist Shinya Yamanaka had made earlier the discovery, earning the Nobel Pr...

Some existing anti-cancer drugs may act in part by…

Bolstering the notion that RNA should be considered an important drug-discovery target, scientists at Scripps Research have found that several existing, FDA-approved anti...

FDA takes steps to foster greater efficiency in bi…

Today, the agency withdrew the draft guidance, "Statistical Approaches to Evaluate Analytical Similarity," issued in September 2017. The draft guidance, if finalized as w...

Poliovirus therapy for recurrent glioblastoma has …

A genetically modified poliovirus therapy developed at Duke Cancer Institute shows significantly improved long-term survival for patients with recurrent glioblastoma, wit...

Novartis Clear about Psoriasis survey data highlig…

Novartis announced today the publication of global Clear about Psoriasis survey data in the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology[1]. The publica...

How targeting metabolism can defeat cancer stem ce…

Researchers are the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer are unraveling a crucial thread that explains why cancer so often becomes resistant to treatment. In a breakthroug...

New small molecules pave the way for treating auto…

The innate immune system is the first line of defense, with cells that quickly identify "foreign" motifs from viruses and bacteria and mount up a counterattack to elimina...