Bristol-Myers Squibb and Duke Translational Medicine Institute form strategic relationship

Bristol-Myers SquibbBristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE:BMY) and Duke Translational Medicine Institute (DTMI) announced the formation of a strategic relationship to broaden interactions between the two organizations. The relationship builds on a decade of collaboration in cardiology, endocrinology, and oncology, and will extend into other therapeutic areas at all stages of development, fostering increased exchange between DTMI researchers, and Bristol-Myers Squibb scientists and project teams.

For the first project, DTMI translational researchers led by Drs. Paul Noble and John Sundy will work with Bristol-Myers Squibb scientists on the clinical development of BMS-986202, an orally available lysophosphatidic acid 1 (LPA1) receptor antagonist under investigation to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The cross-organizational team will co-develop and co-implement the protocol for a Phase II study that is expected to begin in late 2012, and will undertake biomarker validation studies. IPF is a chronic, progressive form of lung disease characterized by fibrosis, or scarring of lung tissue, with limited treatment options.

Future projects could include working together to accelerate promising investigational drugs into proof-of-concept studies, improving enrollment in clinical trials, and developing disease educational programs.

"More and more, scientific innovation in drug development is happening at the crossroad of different disciplines; so, it is important to nurture relationships at these crossroads," said Elliott Sigal, M.D., Ph.D., executive vice president, chief scientific officer and president R&D, Bristol-Myers Squibb. "Both Bristol-Myers Squibb and DTMI have talented teams of world-class scientists and with our shared commitment to innovative solutions, our hope is that this partnership will allow the organizations to collaborate on projects involving all phases of research, development and disease education."

"We plan for this to provide an excellent example of how we can fundamentally improve the effectiveness and transparency of academic and industry partnerships and relationships," said Robert M Califf, MD, Vice Chancellor for Clinical and Translational Research and Director of the Duke Translational Medicine Institute. "Our work with Bristol-Myers Squibb takes advantage of the scientific and clinical expertise within both organizations and creates opportunities by removing barriers to collaboration, employing rigorous statistical analysis, and encouraging the groups to learn from each other, while we keep our focus on patients and improving health." Bristol-Myers Squibb and DTMI have established a joint steering committee of functional leaders and scientists that will forge the partnership, identify the points of intersection, and prioritize projects.

About Bristol-Myers Squibb
Bristol-Myers Squibb is a global biopharmaceutical company whose mission is to discover, develop and deliver innovative medicines that help patients prevail over serious diseases.

About Duke Translational Medicine Institute
Duke University is a leading university dedicated to promoting global health through advanced biomedical research, graduate-level education in the life sciences and health professions, and delivery of patient care. Duke Translational Medicine Institute employs approximately 1300 scientists, project leaders, statisticians, biomedical informaticists, and educators. DTMI is dedicated to catalyzing translation across the continuum of scientific discovery, clinical research, care delivery, and global health.

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